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Arthur James HAPPS

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Surname: HAPPS

Forename(s): Arthur James

Place of Birth: Steeton, Yorkshire

Service No: 27900

Rank: Private

Regiment / Corps / Service: Durham Light Infantry

Battalion / Unit: 14th (Service) Battalion

Division: 6th Division

Age: ---

Date of Death: 1917-04-20

Awards: ---

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: Panel 106 and 107.

CWGC Cemetery: ---

CWGC Memorial: LOOS MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: CROSSHILLS, YORKSHIRE

Local War Memorial: KILDWICK, YORKSHIRE

Local War Memorial: SUTTON-IN-CRAVEN, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

Arthur James Happs was the son of George Henry and Sarah Elizabeth Happs, née Percy and brother of Private Matthew Percy Happs (300194) (q.v.). Their father was born at Hadlow, Kent and mother at Scalby near Scarborough, Yorkshire. Arthur and Matthews' brother, Harry, was married to Eliza Towers, the sister of Private Matthew Horseman Towers (241471) (q.v.).

1891 Throxenby Parish, Yorkshire Census: Newby Hall - Arthur D. Hopps [sic], aged 3 years, born Steeton, Yorkshire, son of Harry and Sarah E. Hopps. [Harry and Sarah were living with her parents, William and Mary Percy.]

1901 Glusburn, Yorkshire Census: Institute Street - Arthur James Happs, aged 13 years, born Steeton, Yorkshire, son of George Hy and Sarah Eliz. Happs.

Arthur was married to Kathleen May Cotterill in 1908.

1911 Sutton-in-Craven, Yorkshire Census: 12, Victoria Street - Arthur James Happs, aged 23 years, born Steeton, Yorkshire, husband of Kathleen May Happs.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Pte Arthur J. Happs, 27900, Durham Light Infantry.

Data Source: Local War Memorial

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Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record: ---

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No photo available for this Soldier
Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Durham Light Infantry

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Durham Light Infantry

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 6th Division

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 6th Division

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: HAPPS

Forename(s): Arthur James

Born:

Residence: Glusburn

Enlisted: Newcastle

Number: 27900

Rank: Private

Regiment: Durham Light Infantry

Battalion: 14th Battalion

Decorations:

Died Date: 20/04/17

Died How: Killed in action

Theatre of War: France & Flanders

Notes:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: HAPPS

Forename(s): Arthur J.

Nationality: United Kingdom

Service Number: 27900

Rank: Private

Regiment: Durham Light Infantry

Unit: 14th Battalion

Age:

Awards:

Died Date: 1917-04-20

Additional Information:

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18 May 1917

CROSSHILLS SOLDIER MISSING

Some anxiety is felt regarding Stretcher-bearer Percy Happs, of the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment. Letters recently sent by his wife have been returned, the last being marked “missing.” His brother, Pte. Harry Happs, of the same regiment, has sent letters stating that Percy was missing, but he hopes that he might turn up in hospital. He has been missing since April 28th. Pte. Arthur Happs, of the Durham Light Infantry, is also serving.

The three young men are the sons of Mr. and Mrs. Happs, of Hartley Street, Glusburn. All are married. Mrs. Happs’s son-in-law, Pte. Charles E. Whiteoak, is also serving in France.

Percy Happs joined in September, 1914, and went out in April, 1915, but was invalided home following an accident, being in England twelve months. Harry, who joined in 1915, has recently been home, in hospital with trench feet, but had returned to France. Arthur joined in 1916, and went out in January, 1917. The three brothers comprise all Mr. and Mrs. Happs’s sons.

08 February 1918

GLUSBURN

SOLDIER BROTHERS MISSING AND KILLED

Mr. and Mrs. Happs, of Hartley Street, Glusburn, whose three sons all joined the colours, received information some time ago from the War Office that their sons, Pte. Percy Happs, of the Duke
of Wellington’s Regiment, and Pte. Arthur Happs, of the Durham Light Infantry, were both missing, Percy (the eldest), since April 25th, 1917, and Arthur (youngest), had been reported wounded and missing since April 20th, 1917. Much anxiety has been experienced by the parents regarding their sons, and recently in reply to inquiries an official communication was again received, bearing the sad news that their son, Pte. Percy Happs, was either killed on the 25th of April, or had since died. The statement contained Royal sympathies. No further news has been received relating to the youngest son, Pte. Arthur Happs, except that the worst is feared, and little hopes are entertained of his being a prisoner. It appears that the last time he was seen by his pals he was wounded and left in the trenches, which were taken by the Germans. Pte. Percy Happs, who is assumed killed, was a member of the Territorials before the outbreak of war. He joined up on August 11th, 1914, and went out in April, 1915. The second son of Mr. and Mrs. Happs, Pte. Harry Happs (stretcher bearer), of the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, joined the forces in May, 1916. He has twice been wounded, and has recently gone out again for the third time. All the three brothers are married.

15 February 1918

CROSSHILLS

MEMORIAL SERVICE – On Sunday evening last a memorial service was conducted in the Wesleyan Church by Rev. Thomas Dargue (superintendent minister). Special hymns were sung, and the anthem ‘What are these?’ was given by the choir, under the leadership of Miss Thornton, of Sutton. The opening hymn was ‘Give me the wings of faith to rise.’ Prior to the sermon, Mr. Dargue referred to the trials of life which came to the human family, but that which struck hardest, he remarked, was that which took men from their homes and family. Four young men who had gone through their Sunday-school had passed from them. Private Benjamin Freeman, of the Canadian Regiment, was killed on November 5th; Private G. Inskip, of the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, was killed on November 27th; Private Arthur Happs, of the Durham Light Infantry, had been missing since April 21st, all hope of his being alive has gone. Private Percy Happs, of the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, who had been missing since the 26th of April, only four days after his brother, and of whom special enquiries had been made through their chief chaplain, who gave little hope of his being taken prisoner, and the fears entertained of his death were probably true. He offered his sympathy and hoped that consolation might be found in knowing that they died bravely for the good of the world. Mr. Dargue also referred to the good characters of the deceased, and expressed the sympathy of the church with the parents and those who had suffered loss in the passing of these four young men. Mr. Dargue’s discourse was based upon the words taken from the 21st chapter of Revelation, 23rd verse, “And the lamb is the light thereof.” Often, he remarked, he had asked why the innocent suffered with the guilty, and why did not something happen to the men who had brought this calamity upon them, which had been the cause of so many lives being lost? In the city where our loved ones in Christ had gone, the mystery was made clear and straight, for the city was God illuminated. He was the light, and the light gave full knowledge to those who had passed into the homeland. The service closed with the hymn ‘For ever with the Lord.’

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