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Arthur HARGREAVES (2)

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Surname: HARGREAVES

Forename(s): Arthur

Place of Birth: Glusburn, Yorkshire

Service No: 41536

Rank: Private

Regiment / Corps / Service: Northumberland Fusiliers

Battalion / Unit: 24th (Service) Battalion. (1st Tyneside Irish)

Division: 34th Division

Age: 21

Date of Death: 1917-04-19

Awards: ---

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: XIX. C. 15.

CWGC Cemetery: ETAPLES MILITARY CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: ---

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: CROSSHILLS, YORKSHIRE

Local War Memorial: KILDWICK, YORKSHIRE

Local War Memorial: SUTTON-IN-CRAVEN, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

Arthur Hargreaves was the son of Stephen and Emma Hargreaves, née Brown. Stephen was born at Sutton-in-Craven and Emma at Cononley, Yorkshire.

1901 Glusburn, Yorkshire Census: Scott House Farm - Arthur Hargreaves, aged 5 years, born Glusburn, son of Stephen and Emma Hargreaves.

1911 Glusburn, Yorkshire Census: Scott House - Arthur Hargreaves, aged 15 years, born Glusburn, son of Stephen and Emma Hargreaves.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Pte Arthur Hargreaves, 3/19936, West Riding Regiment & 41536, Northumberland Fusiliers.

Data Source: Cravens Part in the Great War - original CPGW book entry

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Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record: ---

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Private Arthur HARGREAVES

Private Arthur HARGREAVES

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Northumberland Fusiliers

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Northumberland Fusiliers

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 34th Division

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 34th Division

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: HARGREAVES

Forename(s): Arthur

Born: Glusburn, Yorks

Residence:

Enlisted: Keighley, Yorks

Number: 41536

Rank: Private

Regiment: Northumberland Fusiliers

Battalion: 24th Battalion (Tyneside Irish)

Decorations:

Died Date: 19/04/17

Died How: Died of wounds

Theatre of War: France & Flanders

Notes: Formerly 19936, West Riding Regt.

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: HARGREAVES

Forename(s): A

Nationality: United Kingdom

Service Number: 41536

Rank: Private

Regiment: Northumberland Fusiliers

Unit: 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion

Age: 21

Awards:

Died Date: 1917-04-19

Additional Information: Son of Stephen and Emma Hargreaves, of Scott House, Glusburn, Yorks.

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Etaples Military Cemetery

Etaples Military Cemetery

CWGC Headstone

Etaples Military Cemetery

Etaples Military Cemetery

CWGC Headstone - personal inscription

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27 April 1917

HARGREAVES – April 9th 1917, died from wounds received in action in France, Pte. Arthur Hargreaves of the West Riding Regiment, younger son of Mr. and Mrs. Hargreaves, Scott House Farm, Glusburn.

27 April 1917

GLUSBURN – PRIVATE ARTHUR HARGREAVES DIES FROM WOUNDS

The village of Glusburn has been saddened by the news that Private Arthur Hargreaves had died of wounds received in action in France on Easter Monday. About ten days ago Mr. and Mrs. Hargreaves, of Scott House Farm, Glusburn, received a long letter from an Army Chaplain informing them that their son had been wounded in the back, and hoped to be able to write to them shortly. Nothing further was heard until Monday, when a postcard was received by Mr. Fred Hudson from Private Hargreaves, which stated that he was in hospital suffering from a wound on the left side of his back, and was going on nicely. This card was taken up to Scott House Farm, and had hardly been read when a letter with three communications inside was received from France. The letter contained a letter written by Private Hargreaves from hospital to his mother saying that he was going on as well as could be expected; a letter from the Matron of the Base Hospital where he had been taken stating that on Thursday of last week he passed away after having had a good night; and a photograph of the cemetery where Private Hargreaves had been buried.

The Matron in her letter said that he had died very suddenly, after having slept all through the night. He had been buried with all military honours in the Cemetery near the Hospital, and she expressed her deep sympathy with his parents in their great bereavement.

Much sympathy is felt with Mr. and Mrs. Hargreaves in the loss of their younger and favourite son.

It is a year ago since he and his close companion, Private Harry Whiteoak, joined the West Riding Regiment. After training in this country they were sent to France, and were transferred to the Northumberland Fusiliers. Both were wounded on the same day. Private Whiteoak being at present in hospital at Lincoln. Private Hargreaves, at the time of enlistment, was employed by Messrs. John Binns and Sons, Cowling. He was a most loveable young man, and was highly respected by everyone, young and old alike, with whom he came in contact.

19 April 1918

HARGREAVES – In loving memory of our dear son and brother, Private Arthur Hargreaves, Northumberland Fusiliers, who died of wounds April 19th, 1917, at St. John’s Hospital, Etaples, aged 21 years.

A loving son and brother kind,
A beautiful memory left behind;
In the midst of strife he passed to rest,
We miss him most who loved him best.

From Father, Mother, Sisters and Brother, Scott House, Glusburn.

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20 April 1917

SUTTON – WOUNDED SOLDIERS

Mr. and Mrs. Smith Whiteoak, of Glusburn Bridge, have received information that their only son, Pte. Harry Whiteoak, of the Northumberland Fusiliers, has been wounded, though no particulars are yet to hand. Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Hargreaves, of Scott House Farm, have also received word that their son, Pte. Arthur Hargreaves, of the same regiment as his friend and pal, Pte. Whiteoak, has been wounded. The information is sent by the chaplain, who states that the wound is in the back. Both these young men joined up a year last Saturday, and went out to France in July last.

27 April 1917

HARGREAVES – Died of wounds in France April 19th, Pte. Arthur Hargreaves. of the Northumberland Fusiliers, younger son of Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Hargreaves, of Scott House Farm, Glusburn.

27 April 1917

GLUSBURN SOLDIER DIES OF WOUNDS

Deep regret is felt throughout the village by the death of Pte. Arthur Hargreaves, of the Northumberland Fusiliers, younger son of Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Hargreaves, of Scott House Farm. The family were notified last week regarding their son being wounded. Mr. Fred Hudson, a friend of the deceased, received a birthday card on Monday stating that he hoped to be able to come to England. In the letter he states:– "You will have to be satisfied with a few lines as I am in hospital at the base, having been wounded on Easter Monday at the start of the push, in the left side of my back.” He stated that he had not much pain. The family were cheered on Monday evening by seeing the message, but their hopes were painfully short-lived as the same evening they received a letter from the matron at the Y.M.C.A. Hospital stating that their son had died on Thursday last. The letter was as follows:–

“I am very sorry to tell you that your son died quite suddenly this morning (19th) at a quarter to eight. He was seriously wounded in the chest when brought to us, but was going on well and the doctors were quite satisfied with his progress. He had written to you himself yesterday, I enclose his little note. He had a very good night, and slept quite comfortably until 7 a.m. Then when he awoke he collapsed quite suddenly. The doctors came at once and everything was done for him, but his heart failed, and he died at quarter to eight a.m. I am sorry to have to send you such bad news. Your boy was so good and brave, and was looking forward to being sent to England as soon as well enough to travel. He will have a military funeral and be buried in the military cemetery here at Etaples.”

27 April 1917

GLUSBURN – A MESSAGE FROM THE HOSPITAL

Mr and Mrs. Smith Whiteoak, of the Corn Mill Bridge, Glusburn, have received a message from their only son, Private Harry Whiteoak, of the Northumberland Fusiliers, who was wounded during Easter week, and is now in hospital in Lincoln, stating that he is getting on A1 again, his health being much better. He further adds that he has got amongst a lively lot of fellows who don’t know what it means to be downhearted, and so they have plenty of fun and laughter. He also refers to his friend, Private Arthur Hargreaves, of Glusburn, who was also wounded (but now dead). He thinks they were both lucky to pull through, as it was a desperate affair. Private Whiteoak’s brigade were picked to make the first attack of the big push on the German 4th line, he being one of the first to go over the top. He kept with his pal until hit. He succeeded in getting back to the line, and was then hurried away. He closes with the phrase “And I was not half happy I can tell you.”

24 August 1917

TWO GLUSBURN COUSINS

Private Harry Whiteoak Gains the Military Medal

Mr. and Mrs. Smith Whiteoak, of the Corn Mill Bridge, Glusburn, have received information that their only son, Pte. Harry Whiteoak, of the Northumberland Fusiliers, has been awarded the Military Medal. The award is for “good work and for sticking to his gun when twice wounded.” The work referred to by his officer happened on April 9th (Easter Monday) at the Battle of Arras. Pte. Whiteoak’s action showed real pluck and tenacity of purpose, although he himself only regards the affair as “simply doing his duty.” It appears that orders were given to go over at 6-30 in the morning, and Pte. Whiteoak received the first wound in the arm during the first few seconds, but he determined that he would not go back for a slight wound, although it turned out worse than he thought. He received another wound while working the gun. Others of his pals were also wounded. As long as he could use his arm at all he felt it his duty to hold on, which he did until the arm refused to respond to the will which was still for “sticking it.” The time when he was compelled to seek shelter in a dug-out at the request of his pals was 11-30, he having held on for five hours. The officer in command regarded the action as very plucky and praiseworthy. The holding on of Pte. Whiteoak was the means of silencing the enemy guns that had for some time been harassing our men from a little hillock. After being taken to the dressing station he was in hospital at Etaples for a week, then he came to dear old Blighty and was for a time at Lincoln hospital then at Bowine, where he was visited by his mother. He spent a furlough at his home some three months ago, and then returned to camp at Sutton-on-Hull, and went out again to France some two months ago.

Pte. Whiteoak joined the colours in April, 1916, and went out in July. Prior to joining he was employed at Messrs. John Binns and Sons, Cowling. He cannot lay claim to having any desire to be a soldier, but now that he is one he feels it his duty to do his bit well. He is cousin to Sergt. Edgar Green, D.C.M., of Sutton. In his letters home to his parents he refers often to the great loss he has sustained by of his pal, Pte. Arthur Hargreaves, son of Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Hargreaves, of Scott House Farm, Glusburn. The two were close companions as civilians and soldiers, being village lads together.

Sergt. Edgar Green, D.C.M., Gassed

Sergt. Edgar Green, D.C.M., son of Mr. Joseph Green, of Sutton, who won the D.C.M. for conspicuous bravery under heavy shell fire, was admitted to Netley Hospital on August 10th suffering from the effect of gas poison. It is understood that the effect is not serious. Sergt. Green has seen some very hard fighting and was slightly wounded some time ago. When Sergt. Green won the D.C.M. the inhabitants of Sutton regarded the honour as belonging to the village, and a purse of money was presented to him. He was also presented with a watch by Mr. Sam Sunderland, Fleece Mills, Keighley, where he was employed as gear cutter. He joined the army in September, 1914, and has the signal honour of being the only one in the district to gain the D.C.M. His cousin, Pte. H. Whiteoak, has gained the Military Medal. Both are grandsons of the late Mr. Joshua Green, of Surgill Farm, Cowling. Mr. Green was a native of Grassington, where, he served his apprenticeship as shoemaker. He was well known in the dales as farmer and shoemaker, and very highly respected. He died last year, being over 80 years of age.

19 April 1918

To the dear memory of Pte. Arthur Hargreaves, of Scott House, who died at Etaples, France, April 19th, 1917.

Sleep on, dear friend, in a far off land,
In a grave we may never see;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will always remember thee.

– Mr. and Mrs. Smith Whiteoak and Harry, Glusburn Bridge.

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